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Dig Liver Dis. 2010 Jan;42(1):55-60. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2009.04.017. Epub 2009 Jun 3.

Comparison of de novo tumours after liver transplantation with incidence rates from Italian cancer registries.

Author information

  • 1Department of Tissue & Organ Transplantation, University Hospital of Udine, Italy. umberto.baccarani@uniud.it

Abstract

AIM:

The purpose of this study is to describe de novo post-liver transplant malignancies and compare their frequency with incidence rates from Italian cancer registries.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Four hundred and seventeen patients subjected to liver transplantation, from 1991 to 2005, surviving for at least 30 days and without a previous diagnosis of cancer (including hepatocellular carcinoma), were evaluated for the development of de novo malignancies excluding non-melanoma skin cancers.

RESULTS:

During a total follow-up time of 2856 person-years, 43 de novo malignancies were diagnosed in 43 liver transplantation recipients (10.3%). The most common cancers were non-Hodgkin lymphoma (9 cases), cancer of the head and neck (8 cases), Kaposi's sarcoma (6 cases) and esophageal carcinoma (5 cases). The 1, 3, 5 and 10 years estimated survival rates were 69%, 57%, 53% and 42%. Patients with de novo cancers had a lower 10-year survival rate than patients without cancers (58% versus 76%, p=0.005). The risk of cancer after liver transplantation was nearly 3-fold higher than that of the general population of the same age and sex (95% CI: 1.9-3.6). De novo tumour sites or types with significantly elevated SIR included Kaposi's sarcoma (SIR=144), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (SIR=13.8), esophagus (SIR=23.4), head and neck cancers (SIR=7) and cervix uteri (SIR=30.7).

CONCLUSIONS:

Tumours after liver transplantation are associated with lower long-term survival, confirming that cancer is a major cause of late mortality in liver transplantation.

Copyright (c) 2009 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
19497797
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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