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Obes Surg. 2009 Aug;19(8):1116-23. doi: 10.1007/s11695-009-9865-z. Epub 2009 Jun 3.

Chronic dieting among extremely obese bariatric surgery candidates.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 301 Cedar St., 2nd Floor, P.O. Box 208098, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. megan.roehrig@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Extremely obese bariatric surgery candidates report numerous episodes of both successful and unsuccessful dieting attempts, but little is known about the clinical significance of frequent dieting attempts in this patient group.

METHODS:

The current study examined psychological and weight-related correlates of self-reported dieting frequency in 219 bariatric surgery candidates (29 men and 190 women). Prior to surgery, patients completed a battery of established self-report assessments. Patients were dichotomized into chronic dieters (n=109) and intermittent dieters (n=110) based on a median split of self-reported percent time spent dieting during adulthood. The two dieting groups were compared on demographics, eating and weight history, eating disorder psychopathology, and global functioning.

RESULTS:

Chronic dieters had significantly lower pre-operative body mass indexes (BMIs), lower highest-ever BMIs, more episodes of weight cycling, and earlier ages of onset for overweight and dieting than intermittent dieters. After controlling for differences in BMI, chronic dieters were found to have statistically but not clinically significant elevations in eating concerns, dietary restraint, and body dissatisfaction than infrequent dieters. The two groups, however, did not differ significantly on depressive symptoms, self-esteem, or health-related quality of life; nor did they differ in binge-eating status.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chronic dieting is commonly reported among extremely obese bariatric candidates and is not associated with poorer psychological functioning or binge eating and may be beneficial in attenuating even greater weight gain. Our findings provide preliminary data to suggest that requiring additional presurgical weight loss attempts may not be warranted for the vast majority of extremely obese bariatric candidates.

PMID:
19495894
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3671950
Free PMC Article
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