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Hong Kong Med J. 2009 Jun;15(3):173-8.

Impact of diabetes on early and mid-term survival after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in the Hong Kong Chinese population.

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  • 1Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong, Grantham Hospital, Hong Kong. auwingkuk@yahoo.com.hk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the impact of diabetes on early and mid-term survival in the Hong Kong Chinese population undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

DESIGN:

Prospective study.

SETTING:

Regional hospital, Hong Kong.

PATIENTS:

A total of 904 consecutive patients following coronary artery bypass graft surgery from November 1999 to December 2003 were prospectively analysed. Among them, 377 (42%) diabetic and 527 (58%) non-diabetic patients were evaluated.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Hospital mortality, mid-term mortality, and percutaneous coronary intervention-free survival.

RESULTS:

The diabetic group had a higher risk score than the non-diabetic group (mean+/-standard deviation: EuroSCORE 4.7+/-3.4 and 3.6+/-3.4, respectively; P<0.001). Hospital mortality was 3.4% in the diabetic group compared to 2.8% in the non-diabetic group (P=0.698). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 30% and preoperative intubation as independent risk factors for early hospital death. There were 81 late deaths and the actuarial survival at 48 months for the diabetic and non-diabetic patients were 86% and 90%, respectively (P=0.298). The angina-free survival and percutaneous coronary intervention-free survival at 48 months for the diabetic and non-diabetic patients yielded no statistically significant difference.

CONCLUSIONS:

Diabetes mellitus was not a predictor of early and mid-term mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in our Chinese population. Furthermore, diabetes did not affect angina recurrence or intervention free-survival up to 4 years.

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PMID:
19494371
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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