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Bioinformatics. 2009 Jun 15;25(12):i110-8. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btp199.

Grouped graphical Granger modeling for gene expression regulatory networks discovery.

Author information

  • 1Mathematical Sciences Department, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598, USA. aclozano@us.ibm.com

Abstract

We consider the problem of discovering gene regulatory networks from time-series microarray data. Recently, graphical Granger modeling has gained considerable attention as a promising direction for addressing this problem. These methods apply graphical modeling methods on time-series data and invoke the notion of 'Granger causality' to make assertions on causality through inference on time-lagged effects. Existing algorithms, however, have neglected an important aspect of the problem--the group structure among the lagged temporal variables naturally imposed by the time series they belong to. Specifically, existing methods in computational biology share this shortcoming, as well as additional computational limitations, prohibiting their effective applications to the large datasets including a large number of genes and many data points. In the present article, we propose a novel methodology which we term 'grouped graphical Granger modeling method', which overcomes the limitations mentioned above by applying a regression method suited for high-dimensional and large data, and by leveraging the group structure among the lagged temporal variables according to the time series they belong to. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology on both simulated and actual gene expression data, specifically the human cancer cell (HeLa S3) cycle data. The simulation results show that the proposed methodology generally exhibits higher accuracy in recovering the underlying causal structure. Those on the gene expression data demonstrate that it leads to improved accuracy with respect to prediction of known links, and also uncovers additional causal relationships uncaptured by earlier works.

PMID:
19477976
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2687953
Free PMC Article

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