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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Jul;201(1):58.e1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2009.02.025. Epub 2009 May 21.

Associations of diet and physical activity during pregnancy with risk for excessive gestational weight gain.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. astuebe@med.unc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to identify modifiable risk factors for excessive gestational weight gain (GWG).

STUDY DESIGN:

We assessed associations of diet and physical activity with excessive GWG among 1388 women from the Project Viva cohort study.

RESULTS:

Three hundred seventy-nine women (27%) were overweight (body mass index >or= 26 kg/m(2)) and 703 (51%) experienced excessive GWG, according to Institute of Medicine guidelines. In multivariable logistic regression models, we found that intake of total energy (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.22, per 500 kcal/d), dairy (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00-1.17, per serving per day), and fried foods (OR, 3.47; 95% CI, 0.91-13.24, per serving per day) were directly associated with excessive GWG. First trimester vegetarian diet (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.28-0.78) and midpregnancy walking (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83-1.01, per 30 minutes per day) and vigorous physical activity (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60-0.97, per 30 minutes per day) were inversely associated with excessive GWG.

CONCLUSION:

A healthful diet and greater physical activity are associated with reduced risk for excessive GWG.

PMID:
19467640
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2706304
Free PMC Article
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