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Pediatr Res. 2009 Jun;65(6):599-606. doi: 10.1203/PDR.0b013e31819e7168.

The role of epilepsy and epileptiform EEGs in autism spectrum disorders.

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  • 1Pediatrics and Developmental Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1255, USA. spences2@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown etiology characterized by social and communication deficits and the presence of restricted interests/repetitive behaviors. Higher rates of epilepsy have long been reported, but prevalence estimates vary from as little as 5% to as much as 46%. This variation is probably the result of sample characteristics that increase epilepsy risk such as sample ascertainment, lower intelligence quotient (IQ), the inclusion of patients with nonidiopathic autism, age, and gender. However, critical review of the literature reveals that the rate in idiopathic cases with normal IQ is still significantly above the population risk suggesting that autism itself is associated with an increased risk of epilepsy. Recently, there has been interest in the occurrence of epileptiform electroencephalograms (EEGs) even in the absence of epilepsy. Rates as high as 60% have been reported and some investigators propose that these abnormalities may play a causal role in the autism phenotype. Although this phenomenon is still not well understood and risk factors have yet to be determined, the treatment implications are increasingly important. We review the recent literature to elucidate possible risk factors for both epilepsy and epileptiform EEGs. We then review existing data and discuss controversies surrounding treatment of EEG abnormalities.

PMID:
19454962
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2692092
Free PMC Article
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