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J Sex Med. 2009 May;6(5):1223-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2009.01231.x.

The clitoral complex: a dynamic sonographic study.

Author information

  • 1Centre hospitalier intercommunal de Saint-Germain-en-Laye-Urology Department, 4 Place Luois XIV, Saint-Germain-en-Laye 78100, France. pfoldes@clubinternet.fr

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The existence of the G-spot remains controversial partly because no appropriate structure and innervation have been clearly demonstrated in this pleasurable vaginal area. Using sonography, we wanted to visualize the movements of the clitoris and its anatomical relationship with the anterior wall of the vagina during voluntary perineal contraction and vaginal penetration without sexual stimulation.

AIM:

The aim of this presentation is to provide a dynamic sonographic study of the clitoris and to describe the movements of the quiescent clitoral complex during a voluntary perineal contraction. We aim to visualize the mechanical consequences of the pressure of the anterior vaginal wall with women who claim to have a special sensitivity of the G-spot area and vaginal orgasm. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the G-spot and other female genital tissues are beyond the scope of this study and have not been discussed.

METHOD:

The ultrasounds were performed in five healthy volunteers with the Voluson General Electric Sonography system (GE Healthcare, Zipf, Austria), with a 12-MHz flat probe, and with a vaginal probe. We used functional sonography of the quiescent clitoris with voluntary perineal contractions and with finger penetration without sexual stimulation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

We focused on the size of the clitoris (raphe, glans, and clitoral bodies) and of the length of the movements of the clitoris during voluntary perineal contractions.

RESULTS:

The coronal planes during perineal contraction and finger penetration demonstrated a close relationship between the root of the clitoris and the anterior vaginal wall.

CONCLUSIONS:

We suggest that the special sensitivity of the lower anterior vaginal wall could be explained by pressure and movement of clitoris' root during a vaginal penetration and subsequent perineal contraction. The G-spot could be explained by the richly innervated clitoris.

PMID:
19453931
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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