Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Hum Brain Mapp. 2009 Nov;30(11):3795-811. doi: 10.1002/hbm.20807.

Dysregulation of working memory and default-mode networks in schizophrenia using independent component analysis, an fBIRN and MCIC study.

Author information

  • 1The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA. dkim@mrn.org

Abstract

Deficits in working memory (WM) are a consistent neurocognitive marker for schizophrenia. Previous studies have suggested that WM is the product of coordinated activity in distributed functionally connected brain regions. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a data-driven approach that can identify temporally coherent networks that underlie fMRI activity. We applied ICA to an fMRI dataset for 115 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 130 healthy controls by performing the Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm. Here, we describe the first results using ICA to identify differences in the function of WM networks in schizophrenia compared to controls. ICA revealed six networks that showed significant differences between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Four of these networks were negatively task-correlated and showed deactivation across the posterior cingulate, precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, inferior parietal lobules, and parahippocampus. These networks comprise brain regions known as the default-mode network (DMN), a well-characterized set of regions shown to be active during internal modes of cognition and implicated in schizophrenia. Two networks were positively task-correlated, with one network engaging WM regions such as bilateral DLPFC and inferior parietal lobules while the other network engaged primarily the cerebellum. Our results suggest that DLPFC dysfunction in schizophrenia might be lateralized to the left and intrinsically tied to other regions such as the inferior parietal lobule and cingulate gyrus. Furthermore, we found that DMN dysfunction in schizophrenia exists across multiple subnetworks of the DMN and that these subnetworks are individually relevant to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In summary, this large multisite study identified multiple temporally coherent networks, which are aberrant in schizophrenia versus healthy controls and suggests that both task-correlated and task-anticorrelated networks may serve as potential biomarkers.

PMID:
19434601
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3058491
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (6)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Write to the Help Desk