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Age (Dordr). 2008 Sep;30(2-3):111-9. doi: 10.1007/s11357-008-9053-4. Epub 2008 Jun 25.

Rodents for comparative aging studies: from mice to beavers.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biology, University of Rochester, 213 Hutchison Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA. vera.gorbunova@rochester.edu

Abstract

After humans, mice are the best-studied mammalian species in terms of their biology and genetics. Gerontological research has used mice and rats extensively to generate short- and long-lived mutants, study caloric restriction and more. Mice and rats are valuable model organisms thanks to their small size, short lifespans and fast reproduction. However, when the goal is to further extend the already long human lifespan, studying fast aging species may not provide all the answers. Remarkably, in addition to the fast-aging species, the order Rodentia contains multiple long-lived species with lifespans exceeding 20 years (naked mole-rat, beavers, porcupines, and some squirrels). This diversity opens great opportunities for comparative aging studies. Here we discuss the evolution of lifespan in rodents, review the biology of slow-aging rodents, and show an example of how the use of a comparative approach revealed that telomerase activity coevolved with body mass in rodents.

PMID:
19424861
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2527635
Free PMC Article

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