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JAMA. 1991 Nov 27;266(20):2847-51.

Computerized surveillance of adverse drug events in hospital patients.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT 84143.

Erratum in

  • JAMA 1992 Apr 8;267(14):1922.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To develop a new method to improve the detection and characterization of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospital patients.

DESIGN:

Prospective study of all patients admitted to our hospital over an 18-month period.

SETTING:

LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah, a 520-bed tertiary care center affiliated with the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.

PATIENTS:

We developed a computerized ADE monitor, and computer programs were written using an integrated hospital information system to allow for multiple source detection of potential ADEs occurring in hospital patients. Signals of potential ADEs, both voluntary and automated, included sudden medication stop orders, antidote ordering, and certain abnormal laboratory values. Each day, a list of all potential ADEs from these sources was generated, and a pharmacist reviewed the medical records of all patients with possible ADEs for accuracy and causality. Verified ADEs were characterized as mild, moderate, or severe and as type A (dose-dependent or predictable) or type B (idiosyncratic or allergic) reactions, and causality was further measured using a standardized scoring method.

OUTCOME MEASURE:

The number and characterization of ADEs detected.

RESULTS:

Over 18 months, we monitored 36,653 hospitalized patients. There were 731 verified ADEs identified in 648 patients, 701 ADEs were characterized as moderate or severe, and 664 were classified as type A reactions. During this same period, only nine ADEs were identified using traditional detection methods. Physicians, pharmacists, and nurses voluntarily reported 92 of the 731 ADEs detected using this automated system. The other 631 ADEs were detected from automated signals, the most common of which were diphenhydramine hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride use, high serum drug levels, leukopenia, and the use of phytonadione and antidiarrheals. The most common symptoms and signs were pruritus, nausea and/or vomiting, rash, and confusion-lethargy. The most common drug classes involved were analgesics, anti-infectives, and cardiovascular agents.

CONCLUSION:

We believe that screening for ADEs with a computerized hospital information system offers a potential method for improving the detection and characterization of these events in hospital patients.

Comment in

PMID:
1942452
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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