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Mol Gen Genet. 1977 Feb 28;151(1):95-103.

Genetics of carbon catabolite repression in Saccharomycess cerevisiae: genes involved in the derepression process.

Abstract

A recessive mutant cat1-1, wild type CAT1, was isolated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It did not grow on glycerol nor ferment maltose even with fully constitutive, glucose resistant maltase synthesis. It prevented derepression of isocitrate lyase, fructose-1,6-diphosphatase and maltase in a constitutive but glucose sensitive maltase mutant. Derepression of malate dehydrogenase was retarded and slowed down. Sucrose fermentation and invertase synthesis was not affected. Respiration was normal. From this mutant, two reverse mutants were isolated. One was recessive, acted as a suppressor of cat1-1 and was called cat2-1, wild type CAT2; the other was dominant and allelic to CAT1 and designated CAT1-2d and cat2-1 caused an earlier derepression of enzymes studied but did not affect the repressed nor the fully derepressed enzyme levels. CAT1-2d and cat2-1 did not show any additive effects. It is proposed that carbon catabolite repression acts in two ways. The direct way represses synthesis of sensitive enzymes, during growth on repressing carbon sources whereas the other way regulates the derepression process. After alleviation of carbon catabolite repression, gene CAT1 becomes active and prevents the activity of CAT2 which functions as a repressor of sensitive enzyme synthesis. The CAT2 gene product has to be eliminated before derepression can actually occur. The time required for this causes a delay in derepression after the depletion of a repressible carbon source. cat1-1 cannot block CAT2 activity and therefore, derepression is blocked. cat2-1 is inactive and derepression can start after carbon catabolite repression has ceased. CAT1-2d permanently active as a repressor of CAT2 and eliminates the delay in derepression.

PMID:
194140
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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