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Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2009 May-Jun;31(3):274-8. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2009.02.004. Epub 2009 Mar 27.

Is intimate partner violence associated with HIV infection among women in the United States?

Author information

  • 1Community Health Sciences, Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Manitoba, Canada R3E 3N4. sareen@cc.umanitoba.c

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study sought to examine the association between intimate partner violence (IPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among a large representative sample of US women.

METHODS:

Data came from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (age, 20 years and older). The present analysis utilized the subsample of women who reported being in a relationship in the last year (n=13,928). Participants were asked whether they had experienced physical or sexual violence from their partner in the last year, as well as whether they had been diagnosed with HIV by a health care professional.

RESULTS:

Past year IPV and HIV prevalence estimates among women in romantic relationships in the United States were 5.5% and 0.17%, respectively. In models adjusting for sociodemographic factors and risky sexual behaviors (e.g., age of first intercourse), IPV was significantly associated with HIV infection (adjusted odds ratios=3.44, 95% confidence interval=1.28-9.22). We also found that 11.8% of the cases of HIV infection among women were attributable to past year IPV.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study demonstrates a strong association between IPV and HIV in a representative sample of US women. Screening and prevention programs need to be aware of this important association.

PMID:
19410107
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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