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Pediatr Emerg Care. 2009 May;25(5):321-4. doi: 10.1097/PEC.0b013e3181a341c3.

Evaluating the injury incidence from skate shoes in the United States.

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  • 1Michigan State University Kalamazoo Center for Medical Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, USA. rutherin@msu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The goals of this study were to evaluate whether the increased use of skate shoes may lead to an increase in injuries for children and adolescents aged 5 to 14 years in the United States and to describe the types of injuries reported by emergency departments as a result of skate shoe use.

METHODS:

Retrospective analysis of the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2006 for injuries resulting from footwear in children and adolescents aged 5 to 14 years. Injuries resulting from skate shoe use were identified by manual review of the data.

RESULTS:

For the 5-year period, an estimated 3525 patients between 5 and 14 years of age were treated in United States emergency departments for injuries resulting from skate shoe use. The percentage of injuries resulting from skate shoes of total footwear-related injuries varied by year, however, with 1.0%, 1.0%, 0.8%, and 1.9% occurring in 2002 to 2005, respectively, and 11.8% occurring in 2006. This substantial increase in 2006 accounts for 73.6% of skate shoe-related injuries and is statistically significant (chi, P = <0.0001). This rising trend in 2006 paralleled national skate shoe sales, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9982.Most of the injured children and adolescents were white, and there was a slight, nonsignificant predominance of boys. Most injuries in all 5-year-olds were fractures (46.7%), followed by contusions (17.9%) and sprains (17.2%). The most frequent site of fracture was the forearm (38.4%), followed by the wrist (35.1%) and the leg (14.9%). Other injuries included lacerations (7.3%), concussions (6.6%), internal organ injuries (0.9%), hematomas (0.2%), dislocations (0.2%), and injuries not otherwise specified (3.1%). Based on national estimates, 104 (0.01%) patients required admission to the hospital. No injuries recorded in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database resulted in death.

CONCLUSIONS:

As the first study analyzing injury rates as a result of skate shoe use in the United States, this study demonstrated a recent increase in injuries to children and adolescents using skate shoes, which paralleled the products' sales increase. The types of injuries are primarily a wide range of non-life threatening bone and soft tissue injuries.

PMID:
19404224
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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