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BMC Psychiatry. 2009 Apr 28;9:16. doi: 10.1186/1471-244X-9-16.

Bipolar disorder and dopamine dysfunction: an indirect approach focusing on tardive movement syndromes in a naturalistic setting.

Author information

  • 1Eli Lilly Nederland, Medical Department, Houten, The Netherlands. winter_van_rossum_inge@lilly.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It has been suggested that dopamine dysfunction may play a role in bipolar disorder (BD). An indirect approach to examine this issue was developed, focusing on associations between dopamine proxy measures observed in BD (dopamine-related clinical traits using tardive movement syndromes as dopamine proxy measure of reference).

METHODS:

3459 eligible bipolar patients were enrolled in an observational study. Incidence rates of tardive movement syndromes (tardive dyskinesia and tardive dystonia; TDD) were examined. A priori hypothesized associations between incident TDD and other dopamine proxies (e.g. prolactin-related adverse effects, bipolar symptoms) were tested over a 2 year follow-up period.

RESULTS:

The incidence rate of tardive syndromes was 4.1 %. Incident TDD was independently associated not only with use of antipsychotics, but also with more severe bipolar symptoms, other extrapyramidal symptoms and prolactin-related adverse effects of medication.

CONCLUSION:

Apart from the well-known association with antipsychotics, development of TDD was associated with various other dopamine proxy measures, indirectly supporting the notion of generalised dopamine dysregulation in BD.

PMID:
19397831
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2683829
Free PMC Article
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