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J Pediatr. 2009 Jul;155(1):45-50, 50.e1-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.02.005. Epub 2009 Apr 24.

Long-term neurodevelopment of children exposed to maternal nausea and vomiting of pregnancy and diclectin.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. inulman@sickkids.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effects of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) and its treatment with diclectin on child neurodevelopment.

STUDY DESIGN:

An observational cohort study of mother-child pairs ascertained via a pregnancy call-in center was conducted. Three groups of children were studied: 45 with NVP and diclectin, 47 with NVP no diclectin, and 29 with no NVP. Phone calls to mothers during pregnancy and 6 to 9 months after childbirth yielded information on pregnancy, birth, and early child development. Children aged 3 to 7 years received a comprehensive set of psychological tests. Mothers were assessed for IQ and socioeconomic status.

RESULTS:

All children scored in the normal range for IQ, with the NVP-exposed group scoring higher than the non-exposed group on Performance IQ (P < .02), NEPSY Verbal Fluency (P < .003) and Phonological Processing (P < .004), and McCarthy Numerical Memory (P < .004). Predictors of enhanced results were NVP severity and maternal IQ.

CONCLUSIONS:

NVP has an enhancing effect on later child outcome. Diclectin does not appear to adversely affect fetal brain development and can be used to control NVP when clinically indicated.

PMID:
19394042
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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