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Br J Cancer. 2009 May 19;100(10):1540-8. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605047. Epub 2009 Apr 21.

High expression of tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor correlates with liver metastasis and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer.

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  • 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Center for Molecular Pathology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

Abstract

Increased expression of tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor (TATI) in tumour tissue and/or serum has been associated with poor survival in various cancer forms. Moreover, a proinvasive function of TATI has been shown in colon cancer cell lines. In this study, we have examined the prognostic significance of tumour-specific TATI expression in colorectal cancer, assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMAs) with tumour specimens from two independent patient cohorts. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate time to recurrence, disease-free survival and overall survival. In both cohorts, a high (>50% of tumour cells) TATI expression was an independent predictor of a significantly shorter overall survival. In cohort II, in multivariate analysis including age, gender, disease stage, differentiation grade, vascular invasion and carcinoembryonal antigen (CEA), high TATI expression was associated with a significantly decreased overall survival (HR=1.82; 95% CI=1.19-2.79) and disease-free survival (HR=1.56; 95% CI=1.05-2.32) in curatively treated patients. Moreover, there was an increased risk for liver metastasis in both cohorts that remained significant in multivariate analysis in cohort II (HR=2.85; 95% CI=1.43-5.66). In conclusion, high TATI expression is associated with liver metastasis and is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

PMID:
19384300
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2696764
Free PMC Article

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