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Phys Ther Sport. 2009 May;10(2):51-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2008.11.006. Epub 2009 Jan 22.

Humeral torsion and passive shoulder range in elite volleyball players.

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  • 1Department of Physical Therapies, Australian Institute of Sport, ACT, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate variations in humeral torsion in elite male volleyball players and determine whether these changes are related to training history, retrospective injury history and volleyball performance.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Cross sectional design.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-four elite male volleyball players.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Humeral torsion, passive gleno-humeral rotation ranges and the available internal and external rotation from the humeral torsion neutral position of the dominant and non-dominant arm were measured. Training history and retrospective injury status were ascertained from a questionnaire. Performance was assessed by coach perceived spiking ability and peak serve velocity measures.

RESULTS:

Humeral torsion angles demonstrated the dominant arm to be on average 9.6 degrees more retroverted than the non-dominant arm (p=0.00). In the comparison of volleyball players with and without a history of overuse upper limb injury the most significant finding is on the non-dominant side, those with a history of injury had significantly decreased available external rotation from the humeral torsion neutral position (mean difference=-15.1, p=0.04). There was an unexpected negative weak relationship between age commenced and decreased humeral retroversion (r=-0.413, p=0.045). There did not appear to be any relationship between humeral torsion and performance measures.

CONCLUSION:

The dominant arm of elite male volleyball athletes is more retroverted. There was a tendency for stronger findings in the non-dominant arm in volleyball players with retrospective injury history. We were unable to find any significant correlation between humeral torsion angle and performance measures.

PMID:
19376472
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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