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J Pediatr. 2009 Jun;154(6):807-13. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.01.015. Epub 2009 Apr 17.

Sugar-sweetened beverages, serum uric acid, and blood pressure in adolescents.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. nguyens@peds.ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate whether sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, a significant source of dietary fructose, is associated with higher serum uric acid levels and blood pressure in adolescents.

STUDY DESIGN:

We analyzed cross-sectional data from 4867 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004. Dietary data were assessed from 24-hour dietary recall interviews. Sugar-sweetened beverages included fruit drinks, sports drinks, soda, and sweetened coffee or tea. We used multivariate linear regression to evaluate the association of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption with serum uric acid and with blood pressure.

RESULTS:

Adolescents who drank more sugar-sweetened beverages tended to be older and male. In the adjusted model, serum uric acid increased by 0.18 mg/dL and systolic blood pressure z-score increased by 0.17 from the lowest to the highest category of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (P for trend, .01 and .03, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results from a nationally representative sample of US adolescents indicate that higher sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is associated with higher serum uric acid levels and systolic blood pressure, which may lead to downstream adverse health outcomes.

Comment in

PMID:
19375714
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2727470
Free PMC Article
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