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Am J Med. 2009 May;122(5):443-53. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2008.09.047.

Diabetes prevalence and therapeutic target achievement in the United States, 1999 to 2006.

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  • 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. b.cheung@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Changes in the prevalence, treatment, and management of diabetes in the United States from 1999 to 2006 were studied using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

METHODS:

Data on 17,306 participants aged 20 years or more were analyzed. Glycemic, blood pressure, and cholesterol targets were glycosylated hemoglobin less than 7.0%, blood pressure less than 130/80 mm Hg, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol less than 100 mg/dL, respectively.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was 6.5% from 1999 to 2002 and 7.8% from 2003 to 2006 (P < .05) and increased significantly in women, non-Hispanic whites, and obese people. Although there were no significant changes in the pattern of antidiabetic treatment, the age-adjusted percentage of people with diagnosed diabetes achieving glycemic and LDL targets increased from 43.1% to 57.1% (P < .05) and from 36.1% to 46.5% (P < .05), respectively. Glycosylated hemoglobin decreased from 7.62% to 7.15% during this period (P < .05). The age-adjusted percentage achieving all 3 targets increased insignificantly from 7.0% to 12.2%.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased significantly from 1999 to 2006. The proportion of people with diagnosed diabetes achieving glycemic and LDL targets also increased. However, there is a need to achieve glycemic, blood pressure, and LDL targets simultaneously.

PMID:
19375554
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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