Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
PLoS One. 2009;4(4):e5246. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005246. Epub 2009 Apr 16.

In silico whole genome association scan for murine prepulse inhibition.

Author information

  • 1Center for Biomarker Research and Personalized Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. btwebb@vcu.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The complex trait of prepulse inhibition (PPI) is a sensory gating measure related to schizophrenia and can be measured in mice. Large-scale public repositories of inbred mouse strain genotypes and phenotypes such as PPI can be used to detect Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) in silico. However, the method has been criticized for issues including insufficient number of strains, not controlling for false discoveries, the complex haplotype structure of inbred mice, and failing to account for genotypic and phenotypic subgroups.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

We have implemented a method that addresses these issues by incorporating phylogenetic analyses, multilevel regression with mixed effects, and false discovery rate (FDR) control. A genome-wide scan for PPI was conducted using over 17,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 strains phenotyped. Eighty-nine SNPs were significant at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 5%. After accounting for long-range linkage disequilibrium, we found 3 independent QTLs located on murine chromosomes 1 and 13. One of the PPI positives corresponds to a region of human chromosome 6p which includes DTNBP1, a gene implicated in schizophrenia. Another region includes the gene Tsn which alters PPI when knocked out. These genes also appear to have correlated expression with PPI.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

These results support the usefulness of using an improved in silico mapping method to identify QTLs for complex traits such as PPI which can be then be used for to help identify loci influencing schizophrenia in humans.

PMID:
19370154
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2666808
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (3)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk