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J Clin Oncol. 2009 Jul 1;27(19):3169-76. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2007.16.0036. Epub 2009 Apr 6.

The effects of a presurgical stress management intervention for men with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy.

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  • 1Department of Behavioral Science, Integrative Medicine Program, Unit 1330, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, PO Box 301439, Houston, TX 77230, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE This study assessed the short-term and long-term efficacy of a presurgical stress management intervention at reducing mood disturbance and improving quality of life (QOL) in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS One hundred fifty-nine men were randomly assigned to a two-session (plus two boosters) presurgical stress management intervention (SM), a two-session (plus two boosters) supportive attention group (SA), or a standard care group (SC). Assessments occurred 1 month before surgery; 1 week before surgery; the morning of surgery; 6 weeks after surgery, and 6 and 12 months after surgery. Results Results indicated significant group differences in mood disturbance before surgery (P = .02), such that men in the SM group had significantly less mood disturbance than men in the SC group (P = .006), with no significant differences between the SM and SA or SA and SC groups. In the year after surgery, there were significant group differences on Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form survey (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) scores (P = .004); men in the SM group had significantly higher PCS scores than men in the SC group (P = .0009), and there were no significant differences between the SM and SA or SA and SC groups. There were no group effects on prostate-specific QOL or SF-36 mental health scores. CONCLUSION These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a brief presurgical stress management intervention in improving some short-term and long-term outcomes. If these results are replicated, it may be a useful adjunct to standard care for men with prostate cancer undergoing surgery.

PMID:
19349551
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2716938
Free PMC Article
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