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Cell Immunol. 2009;258(1):18-28. doi: 10.1016/j.cellimm.2009.03.007. Epub 2009 Apr 5.

Ibuprofen and other widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit antibody production in human cells.

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  • 1Department of Environmental Medicine, Lung Biology and Disease Program, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

Abstract

The widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) function mainly through inhibition of cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 (Cox-1 and Cox-2). Unlike Cox-1, Cox-2 is considered an inducible and pro-inflammatory enzyme. We previously reported that Cox-2 is upregulated in activated human B lymphocytes and using Cox-2 selective inhibitors that Cox-2 is required for optimal antibody synthesis. It is not known whether commonly used non-prescription and non-Cox-2 selective drugs also influence antibody synthesis. Herein, we tested a variety of Cox-1/Cox-2 non-selective NSAIDs, namely ibuprofen, tylenol, aspirin and naproxen and report that they blunt IgM and IgG synthesis in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Ibuprofen had its most profound effects in inhibiting human PBMCs and purified B lymphocyte IgM and IgG synthesis when administered in the first few days after activation. As shown by viability assays, ibuprofen did not kill B cells. The implications of this research are that the use of widely available NSAIDs after infection or vaccination may lower host defense. This may be especially true for the elderly who respond poorly to vaccines and heavily use NSAIDs.

PMID:
19345936
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2693360
Free PMC Article

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