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J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):473-81.

Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli isolated from retail turkey meat from southern Ontario, Canada.

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  • 1Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, 120-255 Woodlawn Road West, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 8J1. angela_cook@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Abstract

This study estimated the prevalence of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli isolated from fresh retail turkey purchased at grocery stores in Ontario, Canada. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined and assessed for potential public health risk. From February 2003 to May 2004, 465 raw turkey meat samples were collected. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for Campylobacter isolates with a concentration gradient test and for Salmonella and E. coli isolates with a broth microdilution assay. Campylobacter isolates were recovered from 188 (46%) of 412 samples. The prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobials was 168 (81%) of 208. For antimicrobials of very high human health importance (category I of Health Canada's antimicrobial categorization), 12 (6%) of 208 Campylobacter isolates were ciprofloxacin resistant. Salmonella isolates were recovered from 95 (24%) of 397 samples. The prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobials was 50 (49%) of 102, and 13 (13%) of 102 samples were resistant to five or more antimicrobials. For category I antimicrobials, 14 (14%) of 102 and 1 (1%) of 102 isolates were resistant to ceftiofur and ceftriaxone, respectively. E. coli isolates were recovered from 392 (95%) of 412 turkey samples. The prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobials was 906 (71%) of 1,281, and 225 (18%) of 1,281 samples were resistant to five or more antimicrobials. For category I antimicrobials, 30 (2%) of 1,281 samples were resistant to ceftiofur. This study demonstrated that raw turkey pieces are a potential source of human exposure to enteric pathogens, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, if undercooked or improperly handled.

PMID:
19343933
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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