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Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Mar;117(3):417-25. doi: 10.1289/ehp.11781. Epub 2008 Oct 3.

Apparent half-lives of dioxins, furans, and polychlorinated biphenyls as a function of age, body fat, smoking status, and breast-feeding.

Author information

  • 1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029, USA. meghanom@umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In this study we reviewed the half-life data in the literature for the 29 dioxin, furan, and polychlorinated biphenyl congeners named in the World Health Organization toxic equivalency factor scheme, with the aim of providing a reference value for the half-life of each congener in the human body and a method of half-life estimation that accounts for an individual's personal characteristics.

DATA SOURCES AND EXTRACTION:

We compared data from >30 studies containing congener-specific elimination rates. Half-life data were extracted and compiled into a summary table. We then created a subset of these data based on defined exclusionary criteria.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

We defined values for each congener that approximate the half-life in an infant and in an adult. A linear interpolation of these values was used to examine the relationship between half-life and age, percent body fat, and absolute body fat. We developed predictive equations based on these relationships and adjustments for individual characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS:

The half-life of dioxins in the body can be predicted using a linear relationship with age adjusted for body fat, smoking, and breast-feeding. Data suggest an alternative method based on a linear relationship between half-life and total body fat, but this approach requires further testing and validation with individual measurements.

KEYWORDS:

elimination rate; half-life; pharmacokinetics; poly-chlorinated dibenzofurans; polychlorinated biphenyls; polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins

PMID:
19337517
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2661912
Free PMC Article
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