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J Pediatr. 2009 Jun;154(6):819-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.01.009. Epub 2009 Mar 25.

Activity-promoting video games and increased energy expenditure.

Author information

  • 1Endocrine Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. lmlf@iastate.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To test the hypothesis that both children and adults would expend more calories and move more while playing activity-promoting video games compared with sedentary video games.

STUDY DESIGN:

In this single-group study, 22 healthy children (12 +/- 2 years; 11 male, 11 female) and 20 adults (34 +/- 11 years; 10 male, 10 female) were recruited. Energy expenditure and physical activity were measured while participants were resting, standing, watching television seated, sitting and playing a traditional sedentary video game, and while playing an activity-promoting video game (Nintendo Wii Boxing). Physical activity was measured with accelerometers, and energy expenditure was measured with an indirect calorimeter.

RESULTS:

Energy expenditure was significantly greater than all other activities when children or adults played Nintendo Wii (mean increase over resting, 189 +/- 63 kcal/hr, P < .001, and 148 +/- 71 kcal/hr, P < .001, respectively). When examining movement with accelerometry, children moved significantly more than adults (55 +/- 5 arbitrary acceleration units and 23 +/- 2 arbitrary acceleration units, respectively, P < .001) while playing Nintendo Wii.

CONCLUSION:

Activity-promoting video games have the potential to increase movement and energy expenditure in children and adults.

PMID:
19324368
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2683894
Free PMC Article
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