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J Consult Clin Psychol. 2009 Apr;77(2):367-71. doi: 10.1037/a0015238.

Continuation-phase cognitive therapy's effects on remission and recovery from depression.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Truman State University, Street, Kirksville, MO 63501-4221, USA. vittengl@truman.edu

Abstract

The authors tested the effects of continuation-phase cognitive therapy (C-CT) on remission and recovery from recurrent major depressive disorder, defined as 6 weeks and 8 months, respectively, of continuously absent or minimal symptoms. Responders to acute-phase cognitive therapy were randomized to 8 months of C-CT (n = 41) or assessment control (n = 43), and they were followed 16 additional months (R. B. Jarrett et al., 2001). Relative to controls, a few more patients in C-CT remitted (88% vs. 97%), and significantly more recovered (62% vs. 84%). All patients without remission and recovery relapsed, but most patients who remitted (60%) and who recovered (75%) did not later relapse or recur. The authors discuss the importance of defining efficacious treatment as producing remission and recovery.

PMID:
19309197
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3785229
Free PMC Article
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