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J Consult Clin Psychol. 2009 Apr;77(2):257-69. doi: 10.1037/a0014489.

A practical clinical trial of coordinated care management to treat substance use disorders among public assistance beneficiaries.

Author information

  • 1National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. jm977@columbia.edu

Abstract

This study tested whether coordinated care management (CCM), a continuity of care intervention for substance use disorders (SUD), improved rates of abstinence when compared with usual welfare management for substance-using single adults and adults with dependent children applying for public assistance. The study was designed as a practical clinical trial and was implemented in partnership with a large city welfare agency. Participants were 421 welfare applicants identified via SUD screening and assigned via an unbiased computerized allocation program to a site that provided either CCM (n = 232) or usual care (UC; n = 189). Outcomes were assessed for 1 year postbaseline with self-reports and biological measures of substance use. As hypothesized, for participants not enrolled in methadone maintenance programs (n = 313), CCM clients received significantly more services than did UC clients. Nonmethadone CCM also showed significantly higher abstinence rates (odds ratio = 1.75; 95% confidence interval = 1.12, 2.76; d = 0.31) that emerged early in treatment and were sustained throughout follow-up. In contrast, no treatment services or outcome effects were found for methadone maintenance clients (n = 108). Findings suggest that CCM is promising as a wraparound to SUD treatment for welfare recipients.

PMID:
19309185
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3064461
Free PMC Article

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