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Diabetes Care. 2009 Jul;32(7):1224-30. doi: 10.2337/dc08-2124. Epub 2009 Mar 16.

Efficacy and safety of the human glucagon-like peptide-1 analog liraglutide in combination with metformin and thiazolidinedione in patients with type 2 diabetes (LEAD-4 Met+TZD).

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  • 1Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada,

Erratum in

  • Diabetes Care. 2010 Mar;33(3):692.



To determine the efficacy and safety of liraglutide (a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist) when added to metformin and rosiglitazone in type 2 diabetes.


This 26-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial randomized 533 subjects (1:1:1) to once-daily liraglutide (1.2 or 1.8 mg) or liraglutide placebo in combination with metformin (1 g twice daily) and rosiglitazone (4 mg twice daily). Subjects had type 2 diabetes, A1C 7-11% (previous oral antidiabetes drug [OAD] monotherapy >or=3 months) or 7-10% (previous OAD combination therapy >or=3 months), and BMI <or=45 kg/m(2).


Mean A1C values decreased significantly more in the liraglutide groups versus placebo (mean +/- SE -1.5 +/- 0.1% for both 1.2 and 1.8 mg liraglutide and -0.5 +/- 0.1% for placebo). Fasting plasma glucose decreased by 40, 44, and 8 mg/dl for 1.2 and 1.8 mg and placebo, respectively, and 90-min postprandial glucose decreased by 47, 49, and 14 mg/dl, respectively (P < 0.001 for all liraglutide groups vs. placebo). Dose-dependent weight loss occurred with 1.2 and 1.8 mg liraglutide (1.0 +/- 0.3 and 2.0 +/- 0.3 kg, respectively) (P < 0.0001) compared with weight gain with placebo (0.6 +/- 0.3 kg). Systolic blood pressure decreased by 6.7, 5.6, and 1.1 mmHg with 1.2 and 1.8 mg liraglutide and placebo, respectively. Significant increases in C-peptide and homeostasis model assessment of beta-cell function and significant decreases in the proinsulin-to-insulin ratio occurred with liraglutide versus placebo. Minor hypoglycemia occurred more frequently with liraglutide, but there was no major hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal adverse events were more common with liraglutide, but most occurred early and were transient.


Liraglutide combined with metformin and a thiazolidinedione is a well-tolerated combination therapy for type 2 diabetes, providing significant improvements in glycemic control.

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