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J Biomed Sci. 2009 Jan 15;16:6. doi: 10.1186/1423-0127-16-6.

Mutagenesis identifies the critical amino acid residues of human endonuclease G involved in catalysis, magnesium coordination, and substrate specificity.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biochemistry, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan. joyce@mail.cmu.edu.tw

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Endonuclease G (EndoG), a member of DNA/RNA nonspecific betabetaalpha-Me-finger nucleases, is involved in apoptosis and normal cellular proliferation. In this study, we analyzed the critical amino acid residues of EndoG and proposed the catalytic mechanism of EndoG.

METHODS:

To identify the critical amino acid residues of human EndoG, we replaced the conserved histidine, asparagine, and arginine residues with alanine. The catalytic efficacies of Escherichia coli-expressed EndoG variants were further analyzed by kinetic studies.

RESULTS:

Diethyl pyrocarbonate modification assay revealed that histidine residues were involved in EndoG activity. His-141, Asn-163, and Asn-172 in the H-N-H motif of EndoG were critical for catalysis and substrate specificity. H141A mutant required a higher magnesium concentration to achieve its activity, suggesting the unique role of His-141 in both catalysis and magnesium coordination. Furthermore, an additional catalytic residue (Asn-251) and an additional metal ion binding site (Glu-271) of human EndoG were identified.

CONCLUSION:

Based on the mutational analysis and homology modeling, we proposed that human EndoG shared a similar catalytic mechanism with nuclease A from Anabaena.

PMID:
19272175
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2653514
Free PMC Article

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