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Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 Mar;104(3):598-604. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2008.125. Epub 2009 Feb 10.

Association of lipid profiles with hepatitis C viral load in chronic hepatitis C patients with genotype 1 or 2 infection.

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  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Metabolic profiles correlate with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and are known to be predictors of virologic responses in chronic hepatitis C patients on interferon-based treatment. However, little is known about the differential association of lipid profiles with hepatitis C viral load between genotype 1 and 2 infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lipid profiles on HCV RNA levels in patients with genotypes 1 and 2.

METHODS:

A total of 531 chronic hepatitis C patients infected patients with HCV genotype 1 or 2 were consecutively enrolled. Univariate and multivariate approaches were used to estimate the associations between demographic, metabolic, and viral variables and HCV RNA levels.

RESULTS:

Higher serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein levels correlated with higher HCV RNA levels. In multivariate analysis, genotype 1 infection, severe hepatitis activity, milder hepatic fibrosis, higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and triglyceride levels are associated with higher HCV viral loads (P<0.05). Subanalysis on patients with lower body mass index values showed higher HCV viral load was associated with higher HOMA-IR index and total cholesterol level (P<0.05). After stratification by HCV genotype, lipid profiles were significantly associated with HCV viral load in genotype 2 infection (P<0.05), but not genotype 1 infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

A proportional relationship is found between serum lipid profiles and hepatitis C viral load in patients with genotype 2 infection; however, whether manipulation of lipid profiles would improve the response to current anti-HCV therapy is to be determined in further studies.

PMID:
19262519
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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