Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
JAMA. 2009 Mar 25;301(12):1260-72. doi: 10.1001/jama.2009.358. Epub 2009 Mar 3.

A 41-year-old African American man with poorly controlled hypertension: review of patient and physician factors related to hypertension treatment adherence.

Author information

  • Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. lisa.cooper@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Mr R is an African American man with a long history of poorly controlled hypertension and difficulties with adherence to recommended treatments. Despite serious complications such as hypertensive emergency requiring hospitalization and awareness of the seriousness of his illness, Mr R says at times he has ignored his high blood pressure and his physicians' recommendations. African Americans are disproportionately affected by hypertension and its complications. Although most pharmacological and dietary therapies for hypertension are similarly efficacious for African Americans and whites, disparities in hypertension treatment persist. Like many patients, Mr R faces several barriers to effective blood pressure control: societal, health system, individual, and interactions with health professionals. Moreover, evidence indicates that patients' cognitive, affective, and attitudinal factors and the patient-physician relationship play critical roles in improving outcomes and reducing racial disparities in hypertension control.

PMID:
19258571
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2846298
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk