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Psychooncology. 2009 Apr;18(4):405-11. doi: 10.1002/pon.1535.

Effects of treatment factors, comorbidities and health-related quality of life on self-efficacy for physical activity in cancer survivors.

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  • 1Department of Kinesiology, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA. hperkins@rice.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The physical and psychological benefits of exercise for cancer survivors are well documented. Researchers have examined self-efficacy (SE) as a target for promoting exercise; however, the predictors of SE, including treatment factors and comorbidities, have not been examined extensively. The purpose of this cross-sectional analysis was to examine how variables related to cancer and cancer treatment, comorbid health problems, health-related quality of life (QOL), and depression relate to SE for physical activity in cancer survivors.

METHODS:

This secondary analysis examined treatment factors, comorbidity, and QOL data from 148 breast cancer and 134 prostate cancer survivors who had participated in studies examining exercise and QOL. A predictive regression model was developed by testing each variable individually with SE and including the variables that had a significance of <or=0.2 in a multivariate regression model.

RESULTS:

For the breast cancer population, vitality (B=0.23, p=0.02), bodily pain (B=0.16, p=0.07), and mental health (B=0.15, p=0.01) were associated with SE for physical activity. For the prostate cancer survivors, education, (B=-0.20, p=0.036) vitality (B=0.26, p=0.01), and bodily pain (B=0.13, p=0.182) remained in the model.

CONCLUSION:

Treatment factors and comorbidities were not associated with SE for physical activity, but health-related QOL factors of vitality and bodily pain were associated with SE. Thus, subjective measures of well-being are important factors to consider when developing targeted interventions to increase physical activity in cancer survivors.

(c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID:
19241489
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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