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Res Dev Disabil. 2009 Sep-Oct;30(5):910-26. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2009.01.005. Epub 2009 Feb 23.

Progressing from initially ambiguous functional analyses: three case examples.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, United States. jtiger@lsu.edu

Abstract

Most often functional analyses are initiated using a standard set of test conditions, similar to those described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman [Iwata, B. A., Dorsey, M. F., Slifer, K. J., Bauman, K. E., & Richman, G. S. (1994). Toward a functional analysis of self-injury. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27, 197-209 (Reprinted from Analysis and Intervention in Developmental Disabilities, 2, 3-20, 1982)]. These test conditions involve the careful manipulation of motivating operations, discriminative stimuli, and reinforcement contingencies to determine the events related to the occurrence and maintenance of problem behavior. Some individuals display problem behavior that is occasioned and reinforced by idiosyncratic or otherwise unique combinations of environmental antecedents and consequences of behavior, which are unlikely to be detected using these standard assessment conditions. For these individuals, modifications to the standard test conditions or the inclusion of novel test conditions may result in clearer assessment outcomes. The current study provides three case examples of individuals whose functional analyses were initially undifferentiated; however, modifications to the standard conditions resulted in the identification of behavioral functions and the implementation of effective function-based treatments.

PMID:
19233611
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2732186
Free PMC Article
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