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J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2009 Feb;19(1):75-82. doi: 10.1089/cap.2008.0107.

Effectiveness of lamotrigine in maintaining symptom control in pediatric bipolar disorder.

Author information

  • 1University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. mpavuluri@psych.uic.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness and safety of lamotrigine in maintenance of manic and depressive symptom control in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD).

METHODS:

A 14-week open trial was conducted with 46 subjects presenting with mania or hypomania. Lamotrigine was slowly titrated to a therapeutic dose over an 8-week period, during which acute symptoms were stabilized using second-generation antipsychotics (SGA), followed by a 6-week lamotrigine monotherapy phase.

RESULTS:

The response rate on manic symptoms (Young Mania Rating Score [YMRS] <12) was 72%, on depressive symptoms was 82% (Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised [CDRS-R] <40), and the remission rate was 56% at the 14-week end point, on an average end-point lamotrigine dose of 1.8 mg/lb. There was further reduction in depressive symptoms during the lamotrigine maintenance phase. Benign rash was noted in 6.4% of patients. Out of half of the subjects who were in remission at 8 week, 3 subjects (23%) relapsed by week 14.

CONCLUSION:

Lamotrigine monotherapy appears to be effective in maintaining symptom control of manic and depressive symptoms in PBD and shows minimal adverse effects, although a future double-blind controlled trial is needed to confirm this finding. Portal of entry for lamotrigine treatment can be during acute illness and can sustain symptom control after establishing mood stabilization.

PMID:
19232025
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2692234
Free PMC Article
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