Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Pediatr. 2009 Jun;154(6):854-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2008.12.039. Epub 2009 Feb 23.

Impact of Clostridium difficile infection on pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of and explore possible differences in the risk for and symptoms of Clostridium difficile infection between patients with and without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

STUDY DESIGN:

Stool specimens from subjects with and without IBD were evaluated for the presence of C difficile toxins. Demographic information, diagnosis, anatomic location, disease activity, IBD therapy, hospitalizations, and antibiotic and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposures were recorded.

RESULTS:

A total of 193 specimens were collected from 81 patients with IBD and 112 patients without IBD. The prevalence of C difficile infection was significantly greater in the patients with IBD than in those without IBD (P = .004; chi2 = 0.003; odds ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.5 to 7.6). In the patients with IBD, the prevalence of active disease was significantly greater in the C difficile-infected patients than in the uninfected patients (P < .0001). Colonic involvement was found in all patients with IBD. The specific type of IBD, IBD therapy, and antibiotic and PPI exposures that predisposed patients with IBD to C difficile infection were not identified, whereas hospitalization was significantly more frequent in the patients without IBD (P = .025).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings indicate that in children, IBD is associated with an increased prevalence of C difficile infection. The specific risk factors reported in adults were not identified in these children, suggesting the possible involvement of other mechanisms for acquiring the pathogen.

PMID:
19230908
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk