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Econ Hum Biol. 2009 Mar;7(1):1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ehb.2009.01.002. Epub 2009 Jan 21.

Investing in early human development: timing and economic efficiency.

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  • 1UCD Geary Institute & UCD School of Public Health and Population Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. orla.doyle@ucd.ie

Abstract

Policy discussions to ameliorate socioeconomic (SES) inequalities are increasingly focused on investments in early childhood. Yet such interventions are costly to implement, and clear evidence on the optimal time to intervene to yield a high economic and social return in the future is meagre. The majority of successful early childhood interventions start in the preschool years. However socioeconomic gradients in cognitive skills, socio-emotional functioning and health can be observed by age three, suggesting that preventative programmes starting earlier in childhood may be even more effective. We discuss the optimal timing of early childhood intervention with reference to recent research in developmental neuroscience. We motivate the need for early intervention by providing an overview of the impact of adverse risk factors during the antenatal and early childhood periods on outcomes later in life. We provide a brief review of the economic rationale for investing early in life and propose the "antenatal investment hypothesis". We conclude by discussing a suite of new European interventions that will inform this optimal timing debate.

PMID:
19213617
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2929559
Free PMC Article
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