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South Med J. 2009 Mar;102(3):239-47. doi: 10.1097/SMJ.0b013e318197f319.

The Effectiveness of Mobile Discharge Instruction Videos (MDIVs) in communicating discharge instructions to patients with lacerations or sprains.

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  • 1Emergency Department, Ajou University Hospital, Suwon, Gyeonggi, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study evaluates the effectiveness of mobile discharge instruction videos (MDIVs) in communicating discharge instructions to patients with lacerations or sprains.

METHOD:

A prospective controlled study was performed on patients with lacerations or sprains in a quaternary emergency center from April 1, 2008 to May 31, 2008. Upon discharge, patients were systematically allocated to receive printed discharge instructions (PDIs) or MDIVs. Within 48 hours of the patients' discharge, a standard questionnaire was provided via telephone to evaluate the patients' comprehension of, convenience rating for, and satisfaction with their given discharge instructions.

RESULTS:

Of the 645 patients with lacerations or sprains during the study period, a convenience sample of 161 patients was enrolled in the study; 77 in the PDIs group (the P group) and 84 in the MDIVs group (the M group). There were no statistically significant differences in the ages, genders, and levels of education of the subjects in the two groups. The mean of the correct answers on wound care in the questionnaire was 2.7 +/- 0.7 in the M group and 2.4 +/- 0.8 in the P group (P < 0.05). The convenience rating was 85.7% in the M group and 63.6% in the P group (P < 0.05). The rate of satisfaction was 90.5% in the M group and 90.9% in the P group (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The mobile discharge instruction video (MDIV) improved the communication of discharge instructions. Further studies will be needed to explore the actual compliance of patients to treatment regimens.

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PMID:
19204614
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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