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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Apr;200(4):457.e1-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2008.12.012. Epub 2009 Feb 6.

Tissue microarray analysis of hormonal signaling pathways in uterine carcinosarcoma.

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  • 1Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the relationship of hormone (estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta, progesterone receptor) and growth factor receptor (insulin-like growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) expression with disease progression in uterine carcinosarcoma.

STUDY DESIGN:

Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue arrays using standard methodology. Differences between groups were evaluated by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Interactions between tumor stage and receptor expression were determined by linear trend analysis.

RESULTS:

Compared with normal endometrium, carcinosarcomas exhibited low estrogen receptor alpha and progesterone receptor expression (all P < .01), but overexpressed estrogen receptor beta (P = .02). Estrogen receptor beta expression increased in advanced stage disease (P = .02). Insulin-like growth factor receptor expression was lower in carcinosarcoma compared with normal endometrium (P = .01). Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression was elevated and increased with disease progression (P < .01).

CONCLUSION:

In uterine carcinosarcoma, estrogen receptor beta expression is elevated and increases with disease progression, whereas estrogen receptor alpha and progesterone receptor are suppressed. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression is increased, whereas insulin-like growth factor receptor is lower than in normal endometrium. These data support a potential role for estrogen receptor beta in disease progression via crosstalk with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

PMID:
19200930
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2676778
Free PMC Article
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