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Br J Cancer. 2009 Mar 10;100(5):834-9. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6604889. Epub 2009 Jan 27.

Urinary tract infections and reduced risk of bladder cancer in Los Angeles.

Author information

  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 90089, USA. xuejuanj@usc.edu

Abstract

We investigated the association between urinary tract infections (UTIs) and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in a population-based case-control study in Los Angeles covering 1586 cases and age-, gender-, and race-matched neighbourhood controls. A history of bladder infection was associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer among women (odds ratio (OR), 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.46-0.96). No effect was found in men, perhaps due to power limitations. A greater reduction in bladder cancer risk was observed among women with multiple infections (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18-0.78). Exclusion of subjects with a history of diabetes, kidney or bladder stones did not change the inverse association. A history of kidney infections was not associated with bladder cancer risk, but there was a weak association between a history of other UTIs and slightly increased risk among men. Our results suggest that a history of bladder infection is associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer among women. Cytotoxicity from antibiotics commonly used to treat bladder infections is proposed as one possible explanation.

PMID:
19174821
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2653778
Free PMC Article
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