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Jpn J Infect Dis. 2009 Jan;62(1):46-50.

Blood culture confirmed bacterial sepsis in neonates in a North Indian tertiary care center: changes over the last decade.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Abstract

The spectrum of organisms causing sepsis is different in developing countries. Data on the recent trends of organisms causing sepsis are limited. This study was conducted in a tertiary care neonatal unit in Northern India. All inborn babies with blood-culture-positive sepsis from 1995 to 2006 were divided into two epochs, viz. 1995 to 1998 (epoch I) and 2001 to 2006 (epoch II). Organisms were grouped into early (<72 h) and late onset (> or =72 h) sepsis groups. The overall incidence of sepsis, the incidence of sepsis stratified by weight groups, the organism profile on different days of life, sepsis-related mortality and pathogen-specific case fatality rate were calculated and compared between the two epochs. Out of 34,362 live births during the study period, organisms were isolated in 1,491 neonates. Out of these, 89% had bacterial sepsis. The incidence of neonatal bacterial sepsis increased from epoch I to epoch II (35.8/1,000 versus 40.1/1,000 live births, P<0.05). The incidence of early onset sepsis (EOS) did not change between the epochs, but the incidence of late onset sepsis (LOS) increased from 12 to 16.5 per 1,000 live births (P<0.001). The incidence of bacterial sepsis decreased significantly in the 1,000- to 1,999-g birth weight groups. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes decreased, whereas Staphylococcus aureus increased in incidence during epoch II. Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli emerged as a newly identified pathogen during epoch II. Sepsis-associated mortality decreased from 42 to 20%. The incidence of bacterial sepsis has decreased significantly in 1,000- to 1,999-g infants, with a significant reduction in sepsis-related mortality. New organisms have emerged in recent years. The organism profile in recent years has changed, with a significant overlap of organisms causing EOS and LOS.

PMID:
19168958
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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