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PLoS One. 2009;4(1):e4248. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004248. Epub 2009 Jan 22.

Recombinant mouse PAP has pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity and acts through A(1)-adenosine receptors to mediate antinociception.

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  • 1Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, UNC Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is expressed in nociceptive neurons and functions as an ectonucleotidase. When injected intraspinally, the secretory isoforms of human and bovine PAP protein have potent and long-lasting antinociceptive effects that are dependent on A(1)-adenosine receptor (A(1)R) activation. In this study, we purified the secretory isoform of mouse (m)PAP using the baculovirus expression system to determine if recombinant mPAP also had antinociceptive properties. We found that mPAP dephosphorylated AMP, and to a much lesser extent, ADP at neutral pH (pH 7.0). In contrast, mPAP dephosphorylated all purine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, ATP) at an acidic pH (pH 5.6). The transmembrane isoform of mPAP had similar pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity. A single intraspinal injection of mPAP protein had long-lasting (three day) antinociceptive properties, including antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects in the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) inflammatory pain model. These antinociceptive effects were transiently blocked by the A(1)R antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (CPX), suggesting mPAP dephosphorylates nucleotides to adenosine to mediate antinociception just like human and bovine PAP. Our studies indicate that PAP has species-conserved antinociceptive effects and has pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity. The ability to metabolize nucleotides in a pH-dependent manner could be relevant to conditions like inflammation where tissue acidosis and nucleotide release occur. Lastly, our studies demonstrate that recombinant PAP protein can be used to treat chronic pain in animal models.

PMID:
19158948
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2617779
Free PMC Article

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