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Neurobiol Aging. 2010 Dec;31(12):2091-102. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2008.12.002. Epub 2009 Jan 19.

Pronounced microgliosis and neurodegeneration in aged rats after tau gene transfer.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA. Klein@lsuhsc.edu

Abstract

Microtubule-associated protein tau gene transfer to the substantia nigra of rats using the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector previously led to neuropathology and neurodegeneration in young rats. In this study, we compared equal tau gene transfer in either 3 or 20-month-old rats, in order to test the hypothesis that late middle-aged rats are more susceptible to neurodegeneration. Two intervals and two vector doses of the tau vector probed for age-related differences in the initial sensitivity to low-level tau expression. Gene transfer efficiency was similar for both ages, but the tau vector caused more dopaminergic cell loss and a greater behavioral deficit in aged rats at specific doses and time points. Tau gene transfer caused microgliosis relative to the control vector, and to a greater extent in aged rats. The maximal microglial response occurred at 2 weeks preceding the peak dopaminergic cell loss by 8 weeks. The cellular and behavioral outcomes were more severe in the aged rats, validating the model for studies of age-related diseases.

Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
19155101
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2975326
Free PMC Article
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