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Cancer. 2009 Feb 1;115(3):524-30. doi: 10.1002/cncr.24067.

Long-term incidence of cervical cancer in women with human immunodeficiency virus.

Author information

  • 1Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. massadl@wudosis.wustl.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and compare it with the incidence in HIV-uninfected women.

METHODS:

In a cohort study of HIV-infected and uninfected women who had Papanicolaou tests obtained every 6 months, pathology reports were retrieved for women who had biopsy results or a self-report of ICC. Histology was reviewed when reports confirmed ICC. Incidence rates were calculated and compared with those in HIV-negative women.

RESULTS:

After a median follow-up of 10.3 years, 3 ICCs were confirmed in HIV-seropositive women, and none were confirmed in HIV-seronegative women. The ICC incidence rate was not found to be associated significantly with HIV status (HIV-negative women [0 of 100,000 person-years] vs HIV-positive women [21.4 of 100,000 person-years]; P = .59). A calculated incidence rate ratio standardized to expected results from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database that was restricted to HIV-infected Women's Interagency HIV Study participants was 1.32 (95% confidence interval, 0.27-3.85; P = 0.80).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among women with HIV in a prospective study that incorporated cervical cancer prevention measures, the incidence of ICC was not significantly higher than that in a comparison group of HIV-negative women.

(c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

PMID:
19127538
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2641995
Free PMC Article
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