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J Surg Res. 2010 Jan;158(1):162-70. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2008.07.006.

Triphala incorporated collagen sponge--a smart biomaterial for infected dermal wound healing.

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  • 1Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Wound infection is a major problem in the medical community since many types of wounds are more prone to microbial contamination leading to infection. Triphala (a traditional ayurvedic herbal formulation) incorporated collagen sponge was investigated for its healing potential on infected dermal wound in albino rats.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Methanol extract of triphala was prepared and analyzed for the presence of catechin by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. Collagen sponge was prepared by incorporating triphala into collagen sponge. The triphala incorporated collagen was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and water uptake analysis. Infected wound was dressed with triphala incorporated collagen sponge. Wound reduction rate, collagen content, and matrix metalloproteinases in the granulation tissue, histology, and Fourier transform electron microscopy analysis were done to obtain the healing pattern.

RESULTS:

High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed the presence of (-)epigallocatechin gallate. FT-IR spectroscopy study revealed the interaction of polyphenols with the collagen. Triphala incorporated collagen sponge has shown to increase thermal stability and water uptake capability, faster wound closure, improved tissue regeneration, collagen content at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression was correlated well with reduction in the inflammatory phase, thus confirming efficacy of the dressing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Better healing efficacy of triphala incorporated collagen sponge may provides a scientific rationale for the use of this dressing as an effective wound cover in the management of infected dermal wound.

PMID:
19118845
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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