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Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Feb;89(2):617-23. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.26918. Epub 2008 Dec 23.

Lactotripeptides do not lower ambulatory blood pressure in untreated whites: results from 2 controlled multicenter crossover studies.

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  • 1Unilever Food & Health Research Institute, Vlaardingen, Netherlands. linda-van.mierlo@unilever.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dietary factors directly influence blood pressure (BP). The lactotripeptides (LTPs) IPP (isoleucine-proline-proline) and VPP (valine-proline-proline), formed by hydrolyzing dairy proteins, and potassium, a mineral mainly found in fruit, vegetables, and dairy products, are extensively studied for their BP-lowering effect. The efficacy of LTPs seems modest in whites compared with that in Asians.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to study the effects of enzymatically produced LTPs alone or in combination with potassium on ambulatory BP in whites.

DESIGN:

Two multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover studies were conducted; each consisted of two 4-wk intervention periods separated by a 4-wk washout period. In study 1, 69 subjects received 200 g/d of a dairy drink with 5.8 mg IPP and 4.4 mg VPP or placebo. In study 2, 93 subjects received 100 g/d of a dairy drink with 2.7 mg IPP, 1.9 mg VPP, and 350 mg added K or placebo. The subjects were randomly assigned according to their daytime ambulatory BP.

RESULTS:

Mean 24-h systolic and diastolic BP (baseline values-study 1: 137.1/81.6 mm Hg; study 2: 139.2/80.9 mm Hg) remained similar with no significant differences between treatments in either study (P > 0.10). Office BP decreased over the course of both studies (systolic BP > 5 mm Hg), but differences between interventions were not significant (P > 0.10). In both studies, nighttime BP dipped during all treatments (> or =15%) but was statistically more significant with placebo (P < 0.05). Sodium excretion increased significantly after consumption of LTPs and potassium compared with after placebo intervention (P = 0.01), but not after consumption of LTPs alone.

CONCLUSION:

The data do not support a BP-lowering effect of LTPs in whites.

PMID:
19106238
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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