Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Urol J. 2008 Fall;5(4):233-6.

Lubrication of circumcision site for prevention of meatal stenosis in children younger than 2 years old.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, School Of Medicine, Hamadan University Of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. dbazmamoun@yahoo.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Circumcision is one of the most common surgical operations throughout the world, and meatal stenosis is one its late complications. We evaluated the topical use of a lubricant jelly after circumcision in boys in order to reduce the risk of meatal stenosis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A randomized control trial was performed, in which 2 groups of boys younger the 2 years old underwent circumcision according to the sleeve method. The parents in the study group were instructed to use petroleum jelly on the circumcision site after each diaper change for 6 months. In the control group, no topical medication was used. The children were followed up regularly and evaluated for meatal stenosis, bleeding, infection, and recovery time.

RESULTS:

A total of 197 boys in each group completed the study. None of the children in the study group but 13 (6.6%) in the control group developed meatal stenosis (P < .001). Infection of the circumcision site was seen in 3 (1.5%) and 23 (11.7%) children of the lubricant and control groups, respectively (P < .001), and bleeding was seen in 6 (3.0%) and 37 (18.8%), respectively (P < .001). The mean time of recovery in the lubricant group was 3.8 +/- 1.2 days, while it was 6.9 +/- 4.2 days in the control group (P = .03).

CONCLUSION:

Based on the findings of this study, it seems logical to use a lubricant jelly for reducing postcircumcision meatal stenosis and other complications.

PMID:
19101896
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Urology and Nephrology Research Center
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk