Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Emerg Med. 2008 Dec;15(6):334-7. doi: 10.1097/MEJ.0b013e3283036cfe.

Oral, axillary, and tympanic temperature measurements in older and younger adults with or without fever.

Author information

  • 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to compare the results of body temperature obtained by a nurse with standard mercury thermometers from axillary and oral regions with the results of infrared tympanic thermometer in febrile and afebrile patients/in older and younger adults with or without fever, and to determine whether tympanic measures are suitable for use in the elderly population.

METHODS:

This study comprises a single-center, randomized, prospective comparison trial. Patients were allocated according to the Australasian National Triage Scale. Patients in triage categories 1 and 2 were excluded from this study. Only individuals aged 18 years and above were included in this study. Each patient was exposed to a constant environmental temperature for 10 min before the administration of simultaneous temperature measurements, which were performed via mouth, right axilla, and tympanic membranes. A record of readings and descriptive informations was made.

RESULTS:

No statistical significance in readings according to the type or place of thermometers according to the age groups (<65 years/>or=65 years) or according to fever were observed. Tympanic temperature sensitivity and specificity were high.

CONCLUSION:

Tympanic thermometers seem to be optimal for use with the elderly population. Owing to the ease of application, safety, and tolerability in the elderly; their use in routine practice seems to be advantageous. Higher reading of tympanic measurements may lead to a suspicion of infection, especially in the elderly, which may be helpful in clinical treatment in this age group.

PMID:
19078836
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk