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Diabetes Educ. 2008 Nov-Dec;34(6):1025-36. doi: 10.1177/0145721708325767.

Affecting behavior change in individuals with diabetes: findings from the Study to Help Improve Early Evaluation and Management of Risk Factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD).

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  • 1Saint Luke's Primary Care South, Overland Park, KS, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study evaluated whether health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of individuals with type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 (T2DM) diabetes mellitus and those at high or low risk of T2DM were reflected in healthy behaviors and whether these attributes differed for T2DM respondents who did or did not see a health educator.

METHODS:

SHIELD, a U.S. population-based study, included respondents (> or =18 years of age) with T1DM (n = 366), T2DM (n = 3897), high risk (HR, n = 5449) defined as > or =3 of the following: abdominal obesity, high body mass index, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and low risk (LR, n = 5725) defined as < or =2 factors.

RESULTS:

T2DM respondents were more likely to receive health care professional recommendations to change their lifestyle habits (56%-62%) during their average 11 visits annually than the other groups (P < .0001). More T2DM and HR respondents tried losing weight, but fewer exercised regularly than T1DM and LR (P < .0001). T2DM respondents who saw a dietitian or health educator reported better current health and expectations for better future health, tried to make healthy food choices, and followed a prescribed eating plan than those who did not see these providers (P < .01). However, < or =30% of these T2DM respondents exercised regularly, or maintained desired weight.

CONCLUSIONS:

SHIELD findings show that respondents know and understand that improving their diet or exercise will affect their health, but the majority of respondents have not translated it into a behavior. Interaction with health educators and patient-empowering support may improve the transition to behavior change.

PMID:
19075084
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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