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J Intellect Disabil Res. 2009 Feb;53(2):182-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2008.01140.x. Epub 2008 Dec 2.

Sleep patterns and daytime sleepiness in adolescents and young adults with Williams syndrome.

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  • 1Sleep Disorders Program, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. suzanne.e.goldman@vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sleep disorders are common in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and may adversely affect daytime functioning. Children with Williams syndrome have been reported to have disturbed sleep; however, no studies have been performed to determine if these problems continue into adolescence and adulthood.

METHODS:

This study examined overnight sleep patterns and daytime sleepiness in 23 adolescents and adults with Williams syndrome age 25.5 (8.0) years [mean (SD)]. Interviewer-administered sleep questionnaires were used to evaluate nighttime sleep behaviours and daytime sleepiness. Wrist actigraphy was used to evaluate sleep patterns.

RESULTS:

Although individuals in our sample averaged 9 h in bed at night, daytime sleepiness and measures of sleep disruption were common and comparable to those of other populations with neurodevelopmental disorders. These measures included reduced sleep efficiency [74.4 (7.0)%] with prolonged sleep latency [37.7 (37.3) min], increased wake time after sleep onset [56.1 (17.6) min], and an elevated movement and fragmentation index [14.3 (4.6)].

CONCLUSION:

Adolescents and young adults with Williams syndrome were found to be sleepy despite averaging 9 h in bed at night. Implications are discussed for associated causes of sleep disruption and future polysomnographic evaluation.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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