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Langmuir. 2009 Jan 6;25(1):542-7. doi: 10.1021/la802430k.

Can water store charge?

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  • 1Department of Bioengineering, Box 355061, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.

Abstract

Previous work from this and other laboratories has demonstrated large pH gradients in water. Established by passing current between immersed electrodes, pH gradients between electrodes were found to disappear slowly, persisting for tens of minutes after the current had been turned off. We find here that these pH gradients reflect a genuine separation of charge: at times well after disconnection of the power supply, current could be drawn through a resistor placed between the charging electrodes or between pairs of electrodes positioned on either side of the midline between original electrodes. In some experiments, it was possible to recover the majority of charge that had been imparted to the water. It appears, then, that water has the capacity to store and release substantial amounts of charge.

Comment in

PMID:
19053655
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2845823
Free PMC Article

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